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All About Terpenes

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All About Terpenes

One commonly forgotten and overlooked benefit of cannabis is how it can present users with a plethora of wonderful aromas through its terpenes. Terpenes are present in many plants; they are what give pine trees, lavender, and even oranges their smell. But what role do Terpenes play in the cannabis world and why are they so important? 

Cannabis contains a very high amount of terpenes, which is what gives it its strong odor. However, a strong aroma isn’t the only thing cannabis terpenes are providing for you! They are the deciding factor between the strain types; otherwise classified as Sativa, Hybrid, or Indica. Three of the most notable terpenes present in cannabis are Myrcene, Limonene, and Linalool.

Terpenes

Myrcene is the most abundant terpene in cannabis, which is where it’s mostly found in nature. In fact, myrcene makes up as much as 65% of the total terpene profile in some strains. Myrcene smell often reminds individuals of earthy, musky notes, resembling cloves. It also has a fruity, red grape-like aroma. Strains that contain 0.5% of this terpene are usually indicas.

Limonene is the second most abundant terpene in all cannabis strains, but not all strains necessarily have it. As its name suggests, limonene gives strains a citrusy smell that resembles lemons. This comes as no surprise as all citrus fruits contain large amounts of this compound. Limonene is also used in cosmetics and cleaning products. Linalool is another terpene commonly found in cannabis. This terpene is responsible for the recognizable marijuana smell with its spicy and floral notes. Linalool is also found in mint, lavender, cinnamon and coriander.