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Let’s Talk Delta-8 State Legality: Massachusetts

Let’s Talk Delta-8 State Legality: Massachusetts

Massachusetts doesn’t care that people mock their accent,and that their bars close at 1am.  They’ve got things to do in the morning in that place. They’ve got a city like Boston, schools like Harvard and MIT and classic films like “The Departed.” What more do you need? Well, THC obviously. In 2012, Question 3 was passed then in 2016, Question 4 was passed by popular vote. Question 3 was the states answer to medical marijuana and Question 4 was for recreational use, so Delta-9 THC is legal in the state of Massachusetts. Delta-8 THC is a different story, it’s not “legal in the state but there are no penalties for possession.  They’ve borrowed some notes from their neighboring states like new youtk and Connecticut by addressing the fact that the state does not see delta-8 THC derived from Hemp, but more so a synthetic product so it remains a controlled substance. The states website addresses this by stating:

“Because delta-8 THC is not naturally occurring in hemp (except for possible trace amounts), to produce delta-8 THC in commercial quantities it must be derived from hemp synthetically. While the Farm Bill did remove hemp from the Controlled Substances Act, it did not impact the control status of synthetically derived cannabinoids, thus delta-8 THC remains a controlled substance, regardless of the source. As a result, we do not allow hemp-derived delta-8 THC products to be processed or sold in Massachusetts.”

So, it’s legal—but it’s not readily available within the state like Delta-9 THC because it’s considered to be a controlled substance still.

BILL H.4001

SECTION 3.

“Cannabidiol” or “CBD”, the compound by the same name derived from the hemp variety of the Cannabis sativa L. plant.

“Hemp”, the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of that plant, including the seeds thereof and all derivatives, extracts, cannabinoids, isomers, acids, salts, and salts of isomers, whether growing or not, with the federally defined THC level for hemp. Hemp shall be considered an agricultural commodity.

Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018

Effective Date: 10/31/2019

“hemp” means the plant species Cannabis sativa L. and any part of that plant, including the seeds thereof and all derivatives, extracts, cannabinoids, isomers, acids, salts, and salts of isomers, whether growing or not, with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.

“Hemp Products”, all products with the federally defined THC level for hemp derived from, or made by, processing hemp plants or plant parts, that are prepared in a form available for commercial sale, including, but not limited to cosmetics, personal care products, food intended for animal or human consumption, cloth, cordage, fiber, fuel, paint, paper, particleboard, plastics, and any product containing one or more hemp-derived cannabinoids, such as cannabidiol.

“Industrial Hemp”, the equivalent in all meanings to hemp, as defined in this section.

“Tetrahydrocannabinol” or “THC”, notwithstanding any other provision of the law, the THC that is found in hemp shall not be considered to be THC in qualifying as a controlled substance.

Section 121.

The department may inspect and have access to the equipment, supplies, records, real property and other information deemed necessary to carry out the department’s duties under sections 116 to 123, inclusive, from a person participating in the planting, growing, harvesting, possessing, processing, purchasing or researching of hemp, industrial hemp. The department may establish an inspection and testing program to determine delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol levels and ensure compliance with the limits on delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration.

Section 122.

(a). Hemp-derived cannabinoids, including CBD, are not considered controlled substances or adulterants.

(b) Products containing one or more hemp-derived cannabinoids, such as CBD, intended for ingestion are to be considered foods, not controlled substances or adulterated products.

(c) Retail sales of hemp products may be conducted when the products and the hemp used in the products were grown and cultivated legally in another state or jurisdiction and meet the same or substantially the same requirements for processing hemp products or growing hemp under the State Hemp Program.